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Robert Zimmerman Vs A.J. Weberman - Robert Zimmerman Vs. A.J. Weberman mp3 download
Robert Zimmerman Vs A.J. Weberman - Robert Zimmerman Vs. A.J. Weberman mp3 download
Performer: Robert Zimmerman
Title: Robert Zimmerman Vs. A.J. Weberman
Country: US
Released: 1971
Rating: 4.7/5
Format: MP3 FLAC AA AHX VQF VOX TTA VOC AAC
FLAC size: 1921 mb | MP3 size: 1349 mb | WMA size: 1380 mb
Genre: Audio recs

An incredibly funny recorded telephone conversation between Bob Dylan and one of his famous tormentors, A. J. Weberman. Bob Dylan, as we know, disappeared from sight in the summer of 1966, began to raise a family of his own and remained in a semi-reclusive state for close to two years. An album of lovely, if largely conventional songs, Nashville Skyline, seemed to convince Weberman that he was onto something. He had to nail down this fraud good and proper, so he sounded his own call to action.

B. Zimmerman, B. Zimmermann, Bob Zimmerman, R. Zimmerman, R. Zmmrmn, . immerman, Robert Zimmermann, Zimmerman. Robert Zimmerman Vs . Weberman - Robert Zimmerman Vs . Weberman ‎(LP, RE). Broadside Records.

From the back cover : "This album is an unexpurgated, unabridged, uncensored, unforgiveable reissue of Folkways LP FB5322. Issued under license from Folkways Records".

Alan Jules Weberman (born May 26, 1945), better known as A. Weberman, is an American writer, political activist, gadfly, and popularizer of the terms "garbology" and "Dylanology". He is best known for his controversial opinions on, and personal interactions with, the musician Bob Dylan.

These chats eventually emerged on vinyl as the album Robert Zimmerman vs. . Weberman, and you can hear the whole thing at Ubuweb, or below: Introduction.

Weberman has written on the life and works of Bob Dylan, leaving college to focus on creating what he calls a word concordance of Dylan's lyrics. Although a strong advocate of Dylan's importance as an artist, he is less supportive of Dylan the man. Weberman's literary analysis of Dylan's work, which he has termed "Dylanology," is centered around Weberman's assertion that, to Dylan, many words h.

Weberman demonstrates that Bob Dylan’s song lyrics, if cherry-picked and ‘decoded’, can be twisted to show that the singer/songwriter is anything from a Communist to a fundamentalist Christian to an out-and-out neo-Nazi. But it’s in the album ‘Tempest’, according to Weberman’s listener’s guide, that Bob Dylan shamelessly bares his neoNazi beliefs: Well, I'm grinding my life out steady and sure Nothing more wretched than I must endure I'm drenched in the light that shines from the sun I could stone you to death for the wrongs that you've done. Bob Dylan: Pay In Blood ).

Robert Allen Zimmerman emerged from the Supreme Court building at 111 Centre St. in downtown Manhattan on Aug. 2, 1962, as Bob Dylan – but it wasn't his first name change, or the last. He'd been going by Bob Dylan since around the time of his arrival at the University of Minnesota in September 1959. Dylan played harmonica on a 1964 album by Ramblin' Jack Elliott as Tedham Porterhouse. He anonymously recorded a set of legacy folk songs around the same time as Blind Boy Grunt. Robert Milkwood Thomas, the pianist on Steve Goodman's 1972 album, Somebody Else's Troubles, was actually Dylan. He appeared as Lucky Wilbury on 1988's Traveling Wilburys Vol. 1, then as Muddy Wilbury on the 1990 follow-up Vol. 3. He's been self-producing albums under the name Jack Frost since the turn of the '90s, as well.

Tracklist

A1 Historic Confrontation Pt. 1
B1 The Ballad Of AJ Weberman Pt.1
B2 The Ballad Of AJ Weberman Pt.1

Credits

  • Interviewee – Bob Dylan
  • Interviewer – A.J. Weberman

Notes

TMOQ release of historic telephone conversations. An incredibly funny recorded telephone conversation between Bob Dylan and one of his famous tormentors, A. J. Weberman. They're so good off each other it's like a Catskills tummler schtick of great musicological import... "Bob Dylan, as we know, disappeared from sight in the summer of 1966, began to raise a family of his own and remained in a semi-reclusive state for close to two years. By the time he returned to America's stereo cabinets with that wondrous creation, the timeless and beautiful LP "John Wesley Harding", Dylanology itself had taken on an activist edge, almost as a by-product of the souped-up trauma of 1968. Rather than Dylan taking a few years off to live as a normal human being after the marginal achievement of bending American culture to his will, on his own terms, Weberman saw nothing but sinister implications both in Dylan's respite and return. It all got very personal. Within a short span of time he had Dylan going from being the most Progressive voice since Christ (a prophet in winkle-picker shoes) to an agent of the oligarchy, a sell-out, a scag junkie, all kinds of horrors. He was a reactionary Pied Piper; leading the children of the 60s away from the barricades and into his own narcotized haze of blissful domesticity (yuck!). An album of lovely, if largely conventional songs, Nashville Skyline, seemed to convince Weberman that he was onto something. He had to nail down this fraud good and proper, so he sounded his own call to action. He formed the DLF (the Dylan Liberation Front), staged demonstrations outside Dylan's Greenwich Village abode, shouted through bull-horns, chanted, demanded negotiation, scared the bejesus out of the neighbors. Then he started stealing, and analyzing, Dylan's garbage. Through a process he later termed Garbology, he claimed he could derive vast insight and defining proof for his thesis among the discarded cigarette butts, soup cans and Blimpie wrappers Dylan and his family consigned to oblivion. Recordings of telephone conversations between Weberman and Dylan, New York City, January 6 and January 9, 1971. Also contains an otherwise unreleased version of David Peel's "The Ballad of A.J. Weberman".

Other versions

Category Artist Title (Format) Label Category Country Year
FB 5322, #12 Bob Dylan Vs A.J. Weberman Bob Dylan Vs A.J. Weberman - The Historic Confrontation ‎(LP) Folkways Records, Broadside Records FB 5322, #12 US 1977
FB 5322 Robert Zimmerman Vs A.J. Weberman Robert Zimmerman Vs A.J. Weberman - Robert Zimmerman Vs A.J. Weberman ‎(LP, RE) Broadside Records FB 5322 US Unknown


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